Tag Archives | Positivity & Well-Being

Culture Leadership Charge – No Surprises

When I was growing up, my Mom made the best desserts. I remember coming home from school one day and the house was filled with the smell of freshly baked chocolate brownies!

Mom held out a plate of her famous treats! I grabbed one, said thanks, and took a huge bite.

And – yuck. Mom changed up the recipe that day. She added walnuts to the brownies! I got a bite of walnuts when I expected a bite of pure chocolate!

I didn’t like the surprise. I was shocked.

Most employees don’t like surprises, either. Yet our organizations and work teams deliver surprises to team members all the time.

Those frequent surprises cause team members to distrust their leaders and peers. Team members learn they can’t depend on systems or people to support their efforts, to remove frustrations, or to validate ideas and contributions.

That’s no way to run a purposeful, positive, productive work culture.

In today’s three-minute episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I share how you can eliminate frustrating surprises and boost trust, respect, and dignity in your work team daily.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) videos that describe proven culture leadership and servant leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube and Vimeo channels. If you like what you see, please subscribe!

Check out @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership Charge video series on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube Click To Tweet

Photo © Adobe Stock – Wayhome Studio. All rights reserved.

What kinds of surprises happen to your team members at work? How have you reduced the frequency of workplace surprises? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Culture Leadership Charge – Age is Just a Number

I’m old. I turned 65 this year so was able to join Medicare here in the US. I’d never thought about being a member of the Medicare generation!

65 is the age when many people retire. I’m not ready to retire. I have too many good ideas – I think – and there are many clients I plan to help in the coming years.

If I wasn’t able to provide value – to be relevant to my clients – they’d no longer invite me into their leadership teams and organizations. Clients still call me – I must be doing something right!

You may be older than your peers. You may be older than your boss! Age doesn’t matter so long as you’re contributing and serving with grace and humor.

In today’s three-minute episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I outline how you can stay relevant – no matter your age – at work, at home, and in your community.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) videos that describe proven culture leadership and servant leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube and Vimeo channels. If you like what you see, please subscribe!

View @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership Charge video series on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube & @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © iStock – S. Chris Edmonds. All rights reserved.

How do you stay relevant? What tips do you have to offer to help others increase their ability to serve kindly and strongly? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Don’t Manage Time – Manage Your Values, Priorities, & Habits

Sunrise running womanHow well do you manage your time? Do the things you spend time on each day align with your values and priorities? Or, is your time spent “doing things,” even if they’re not priorities to you?

Best-selling author Kevin Kruse’s new book, 15 Secrets Successful People Know About Time Management features the best productivity habits of entrepreneurs, straight-A students, and a few billionaires.

Kevin conducted original research and interviewed over 250 productive people to hone in on how these people manage their time. What he found was that they don’t think in terms of time – they think in terms of values, priorities, and consistent habits.

I love learning. It excites me to try new approaches or applications or tools. I’ve read a number of time management books and taken more than one time management course over the years. I have, of course, crafted an approach that works pretty well for me. I keep nearly all my commitments, which is a huge value of mine. My system isn’t perfect, but it works, mostly.

The problem is that my approach is cemented in my habits. The more embedded my habits, the harder it is for me to change or adapt my approach!

My habits are really embedded. I use a to-do list, religiously. Nozbe is a terrific cloud-based task management system. I also use Evernote, a brilliant cloud-based note system, to track notes, details, and working drafts of my writing projects – books, posts, etc. Evernote and Nozbe interact beautifully together. Both sync tasks and notes on my Macs and iDevices (so long as I have an internet connection).

Kevin’s book provides proof that systems used by many people – including me – need revision if they’re not helping you stay productive and stress-free.

My system’s main flaw is that a to-do item can be easily moved to a different day. Even if I prioritize the task, it’s a simple matter to shift it. But if I move a to-do item, it must not be a priority that day.

Here’s a perfect example. I am a heart patient (I had a myocardial infarction in December 1993). I take meds daily. To be my healthiest self, I have to watch my weight and food intake. I have to exercise daily. And, I still suffer from blood pressure that’s higher than I and my doctor like.

I need to check my blood pressure weekly. It’s best to do it in the morning, before I’ve eaten breakfast, taken any meds, or started drinking coffee. Yet if I didn’t check my to-do list upon awaking (which I don’t do very often), I’d eat, drink my coffee, take my meds – and then see my to-to item to check my blood pressure before all that. Rats.

I didn’t test my blood pressure for weeks at a time, because I saw the to-do item too late in my morning.

Then I learned one of Kevin’s 15 secrets – to work from a calendar, not a to-do list. In other words, when highly productive people want to get something done, they schedule time for it.

So, I scheduled my blood pressure testing for Friday mornings at 7:30am. I’ve missed only a few over the last two months, entirely because I was traveling.

That tip shifted me from “meaning to do something important” to consistently doing that important thing.

I think that I’m on the right track to improving my effectiveness and productivity by embracing some of the 15 secrets Kevin shares. You might, as well.

What is your basic time management approach? Do you use to-do lists or calendarize key activities? Does your system keep you productive and stress-free? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Photo © Daxiao Productions – Dollar Photo Club. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on my podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2015 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I play all instruments on these recordings.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

To Stop Bullying, Stand Up and Show Up

Business group in a row. leader with open handBella is a 5th grader who is battling a life-threatening blood disorder. Last year – as part of Team Impact which pairs children with serious illnesses with college athletic teams – Bella signed a “letter of intent” with the Denver University Division 1 women’s volleyball team. Bella helps out at volleyball practice, has a locker with her name on it, and is the team’s biggest cheerleader.

One symptom of Bella’s illness is hearing loss. She wears hearing aids. At her elementary school recently, a few classmates began bullying her about it.

Her “big sisters” on the DU volleyball team heard about the bullying and decided that “no one was going to mess with one of our family,” one player said. Nine of the college players showed up at Bella’s classroom the next day. Their unexpected visit cheered Bella up – and their presentation to Bella’s class emphasized that different is good, bullying is not.

The team reacted promptly to hearing about Bella’s mistreatment. They stood up and showed up to support their young “team mate” and to persuade Bella’s peers to be kind to everyone.

The Workplace Bullying Institute’s 2014 USA survey found that over 27 percent of respondents have experienced bullying in the workplace. Respondents said that 56 percent of workplace bullying is initiated by bosses.

Worse, the study found that 72 percent of employers deny, discount, rationalize, encourage, or defend bullying.

The instituted offers solutions and resources for targets of abuse and for employers.

Others are standing up against bullying. A recent report in Sports Illustrated examined the prevalence of abuses of power by college coaches of their athletes. Bullying by coaches has been documented for decades. The difference today? The power of social media.

Last May, one football player shared his story of bullying by his coach on Twitter. His experience led to other athletes – current and former players of this coach – to add their experiences. “We had the exact same issues! Thanks for standing up!” one former player tweeted. The groundswell caused the college chancellor to initiate an investigation by outside attorneys. Within weeks, the report validated the abuse of players by the coach – and he was fired one week before the team’s opener.

Dr. Barbara Fredrickson, author of Positivity, has studied positive emotions for decades. In looking at bullying by college coaches, she explains, “in terms of bonding, loyalty, commitment to a team and personal development over time, negativity doesn’t work as well as positivity.”

Ohio State’s Dr. Ben Tepper has made studying abusive leadership in the workplace his specialty. When asked by the NCAA to compare coach-athlete relationships to his database of boss-employee relationships, Tepper found that abusive leadership is two to three times as prevalent in college sports as it is in workplaces.

Tepper explains, “the studies all say that there’s no incremental benefit to being hostile. Hostility always produces diminishing returns.”

When abusive treatment happens, when bullying happens, don’t look the other way. Stand up and show up. Point out the abusive behavior. Ask that it stop.

You may not fix the bullying behavior – but you’ll raise awareness that it’s happening. If enough of us stand up and show up, maybe we can reduce abusive leadership.

Have you experienced bullying in the workplace? How have your proactive organizations responded to quash bullying? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Photo © FotolEdhar – Dollar Photo Club. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on my podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2015 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I play all instruments on these recordings.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Delightful Decluttering

PapierstapelMy storeroom was packed to the gills. My office closet was worse. It was time to clear some of my stuff out.

Today’s venture started with gathering and testing my old photo studio lights so my daughter-in-law can have an easier time taking pictures of products for her cool Etsy shop.

I’ve got a set of terrific soft-box, daylight studio lights that work beautifully. My old lights work fine and will serve her well.

Pulling out those cases required making room to get at those cases – then realizing the stuff blocking those cases was, well, more stuff.

I hadn’t touched a lot of that stuff in years. We’d moved this stuff across state lines multiple times – but I hadn’t referred to it or used it in a long, long time.

Clearing space in the storeroom prompted clearing books and materials from my office closet. Some of the storeroom stuff really belonged in my office closet. My wife needed more space in the storeroom. She helped pack boxes of college textbooks and course materials for the library, for the charity store, and for the dump. Her help made the work go quickly.

In two hours we got space cleared for her needs and for my needs – and we are donating things that others will benefit from immediately.

And, there’s much more stuff that needs to go. It’s plain to see that I keep stuff way beyond it’s potential value.

The problem with having all that stuff is that it requires energy to manage it. If I need something, I look through shelves of books and drawers of files. It slows me down – I have to stop writing (and creating) to sift through my stuff. Too often, I don’t find what I thought was going to be helpful. And, my train of thought, so strong just minutes before, is now derailed.

What clutter gets in the way of your clear thinking, clear creating, clear service, and clear contribution? Some clutter is literal – old files and books and boxes of stuff. Some clutter is figurative – but it disturbs our efforts just the same.

For example, do you rely on dusty, maybe even rusty knowledge or skills to get work done today? Have new, more efficient ways to contribute passed you by?

Do you rely on antiquated systems or processes to stay in touch with internal and external customers? Have new means to engage and connect with peers and customers not made an impression on you, yet?

Have you made assumptions about others’ skills or agendas that inhibit effective teaming and prompt resolution of issues?

In my work with leaders at all levels of organizations, I see this all the time.

If we’re not evolving, we’re eroding. Take the time regularly to clean the lenses, clear the clutter, and start a bit fresher than we were before.

What clutter gets in the way of your best work and your best self? Share your comments and insights on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google +.

How healthy is your team or company’s culture? Don’t guess – get the data with my online Culture Effectiveness Assessment.

Want hands-on guidance for building a safe, inspiring workplace? Join me in Denver for my Culture Leadership Roundtable. This one-morning-a-month series, based on my book, The Culture Engine, starts in March 2015 and ends in September.

Photo © hd-design – Dollar Photo Club. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I play all instruments on these recordings.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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