Tag Archives | GREAT Boss

Culture Leadership Charge – Don’t Tolerate Bad Behaviors

Leaders must champion their desired culture, every day. To create and maintain a work environment where everyone is treated with trust, respect, and dignity in every interaction, leaders must model those behaviors as well as ensure others model those behaviors.

The problem in many organizations around the globe is that leaders pay attention only to results and profits. They don’t notice when people behave badly while pursuing results and profits.

Left to our own foibles, we humans don’t behave well as a species in the work place. We engage in politics and gossip. We withhold information so others don’t perform as well as we do. We celebrate our own traction while eroding the traction – and confidence – of others.

Those bad behaviors inhibit engagement, consistent performance, proactive problem solving, and serving customers well.

Those bad behaviors tear people down rather than building them UP. Bad behavior erodes positive relationships.

Great leaders don’t tolerate bad behavior.

In today’s episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I share the importance of setting high standards for performance and for relationships – and I outline a proven approach for ensuring desired behaviors occur daily.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) segments that describe proven culture leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my my YouTube channel and my my Vimeo channel. If you like what you see, please follow me there.

View @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership #Charge videos on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube & @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © Photocreo Bednarek – Adobe Stock. All rights reserved.



How nicely do leaders and team members treat each other in your organization? What bad behaviors are tolerated today in your workplace? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ mobile updates, texted right to your smartphone! Text VALUES to 72000 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


vimeo_logoChris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips are also available on Vimeo. Subscribe to Chris’ Vimeo channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Culture Leadership Charge – Great Bosses aren’t Bossy

img_0673Great bosses aren’t bossy and lousy leaders don’t lead!

In today’s episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I share three characteristics that set my best bosses apart from the rest.

The first vitally important characteristic all leaders should model? Authentic care.

Watch the video segment to learn why – and to learn the other two characteristics I recommend.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) segments that describe proven culture leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated with trust, respect, and dignity in every interaction.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my my Vimeo channel. If you like what you see, please subscribe.

Don't miss @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership #Charge video series now on @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © Chris Edmonds – iStock. All rights reserved.

How effective are formal and informal leaders in your company? Which of the three great boss characteristics did your best bosses demonstrate? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ mobile updates, texted right to your smartphone! Text VALUES to 72000 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


vimeo_logoChris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips are also available on Vimeo. Subscribe to Chris’ Vimeo channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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Do What GREAT Bosses Do

Great Bosses SurveyAre you a GREAT Boss? Updated research from my GREAT Boss Assessment shows leaders around the world have some work to do to be effective servant leaders.

In my ebook, Be a GREAT Boss (available free to my subscribers), I describe the five characteristics of effective leaders. GREAT bosses:

  • Inspire Growth
  • Honor Relationships
  • Inspire Excellence
  • Ensure Accountability
  • Spur Teamwork

How well do today’s leaders demonstrate these characteristics? Recent contributions to my free online Great Boss Assessment indicate that some leaders do model these best practices. According to over 4,000 global respondents, though, too many leaders don’t embrace them. The attached infographic highlights some of the areas of concern.

As of today, only 45 percent of respondents say their boss inspires their best efforts each day. 58 percent say their boss treats them with trust and respect daily, which means 42 percent of bosses treat team members with distrust and disrespect.

Download-the-PDF

44 percent report that their boss holds team members accountable for performance. Only 32 percent say their boss holds team members accountable for workplace values and behaviors!

37 percent report that their boss doesn’t let team issues fester – that their boss promptly facilitates problem solving to address issues. That means 63 percent of bosses do little to nothing to resolve team issues.

How many of these global respondents said their boss has formally defined their team (or company’s) organizational constitution – specifying the team’s present day servant purpose, values and behaviors, strategies, and goals? 41 percent. That’s better than the rating of only 35 percent three years ago – but it still falls short of the best practices required of GREAT bosses.

What are the benefits of having a GREAT boss – or of being a GREAT boss? I’ve got proof: GREAT bosses generate huge gains – 40 percent and more – in employee engagement and customer service. Results and profits increase by 35 percent, all within 18 months of embracing these effective practices.

Why don’t leaders naturally inspire growth, value relationships, boost performance, demand civility, or require accountability for commitments? They may not know how. Most leaders have never been asked to do anything beyond managing results. It’s all they know. It’s all their bosses did – and do, today.

The proven practices – the specific “how to’s” – are easy to discover. They’re spelled out in my Great Boss Assessment.

I coach leaders who wish to create powerful, positive, productive work environments to embrace the five characteristics of GREAT bosses. It doesn’t require much. Leaders simply need to learn what each of these best practices requires of them – in everyday interactions with team leaders and team members – then demonstrate those behaviors consistently. It’ll take intention and attention to make these shifts.

We need a servant leadership revolution, in all corners of the globe, in all aspects of society. You can help by sharing the five characteristics of GREAT bosses (use the #GREATBosses hashtag so we all can support your efforts). Share the infographic. Better yet, be a model of GREAT boss behaviors yourself – even if you’re not a formal leader.

How GREAT a boss do you have? To what degree do bosses in your organization model these “GREAT” practices? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Infographic copyright © S. Chris Edmonds, The Purposeful Culture Group. All rights reserved. Share at will!

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on my podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.


Subscribe to Chris’ mobile updates, texted right to your smartphone! Text VALUES to 72000 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


vimeo_logoChris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips are also available on Vimeo. Subscribe to Chris’ Vimeo channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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You need a skunk works

The skunk works logo is featured on Lockheed's Advanced Development Program hanger in Palmdale, CA.

The skunk works logo is featured on Lockheed’s Advanced Development Projects hanger in Palmdale, CA.

Sometimes things just don’t work like we expect them to.

Clothes don’t look right on us. Our diet doesn’t support sustained energy and health. Some of our friends turn out to be less values-aligned than we thought.

So, we change things up. We try new clothes. We try a new diet. We insulate from old friends that no longer fit our worldview.

These little tweaks sometimes work better immediately. In most cases, it requires a series of tweaks to find a better fit or better outcomes or better energy.

This approach is continuous improvement in action – small tweaks made to benefit our lives.

In business, leaders try continuous improvement all the time – even if they don’t call it that. If there are quality issues with products or services, leaders inspire process refinements to improve quality. If team members aren’t as productive as they need to be, training is offered. Sometimes team members are rotated to find a more effective mix for productivity.

If products aren’t as popular as they used to be, leaders inspire product tweaks to see if a new feature or application can rejuvenate sales. A new pattern on dinnerware can boost sales. A new sandwich combination can bring customers back.

Continuous improvement is normal and natural, in life as in business.

However, sometimes continuous improvement doesn’t lead to the significant shifts that your team – your business – requires. To make significant shifts might require a skunk works.

A skunk works is a small team of talented, engaged people that work outside the normal business routines and processes to solve difficult problems with minimal supervision or constraints.

The skunk works terminology comes from Lockheed Martin. In 1943, under the leadership of Clarence “Kelly” Johnson, a skunk works team was formed to design and build America’s first fighter jet. Johnson promised delivery of a working prototype in 150 days – so long as they worked separate from the boundaries of the larger Lockheed organization. The secret mission and the incredibly tight deadline inspired the team. They delivered the P-80 Shooting Star fighter in 143 days.

Lockheed’s skunk works is responsible for a number of significant aviation accomplishments, including the U-2, the SR-71 Blackbird, and the invisible-to-radar F-117 Nighthawk.

If small tweaks aren’t leading to significant benefits in your business, you might need a skunk works.

You may be hesitant to give a small team the immediate responsibility for future products or services. So, start small – with a values skunk works.

Ask one of your best bosses – someone who inspires strong performance as well as strong engagement across their team today – to take on the mission of defining and aligning team behaviors to an organizational constitution. Let your skunk works craft their team’s present day purpose, values and behaviors, strategies and goals.

Then let them do their work – with continuous performance improvements – while living their team’s values and behaviors. Let them learn how to hold each other accountable for not only performance but for respectful treatment of their team members in every interaction.

If they’re like most of the team’s I work with, they’ll reap the benefits of boosted results, engagement, and service. They’ll be inspired by a work environment that treats everyone with trust, respect, and dignity.

And what that skunk works team learns about living their values can help other teams throughout your business experience the same inspiration.

Have you ever been a part of a skunk works team? If so, what was your experience? How might your business benefit from a values skunk works team? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Photo © Malfita – Wikimedia Commons. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on my podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2015 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I play all instruments on these recordings.


Subscribe to Chris’ mobile updates, texted right to your smartphone! Text VALUES to 72000 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


vimeo_logoChris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips are also available on Vimeo. Subscribe to Chris’ Vimeo channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Role of Mood in Inspiring Aligned Behavior

Angry grumpy pissed off senior mature man gray backgroundMonths ago I was delivering a day-long leadership program for HR managers. The program was part of a week-long conference at the company’s headquarters. One hundred attendees were split among five classrooms.

Participants were excited about what they were learning and were very engaged. They clearly felt the program could help them not only with managing their own development but with coaching their internal clients to manage their direct reports more effectively.

In the midst of the afternoon’s main activity (structured rehearsals – we never call them role plays!), the senior vice president of HR popped in to my classroom to observe. He came in with a grumpy demeanor and a frown on his face, and leaned against the wall with his arms crossed.

Participants’ reactions were immediate and interesting. They all glanced up at their SVP’s entrance. They all noticed his posture and mood – and looked away. A few looked at their role play partners and rolled their eyes. Participants went on with the activity, but the volume in the room was much subdued after his entrance.

What caused this SVP’s unhappy demeanor? It’s impossible to guess; it could have been one or more of a hundred different variables.

What is important to understand is that a leader’s mood and tone impacts their team’s (or department’s or company’s) players. Leaders do not have neutral impact. Their plans, decisions, actions, and moods are scrutinized by their team leaders and team members quite frequently and quite carefully.

Leaders’ actions and moods either improve player engagement and contribution or they erode it. There is no middle ground.

Am I saying that leaders cannot show displeasure? No, I’m not. I am saying that leaders have greater positive impact by expressing disappointment from a servant leadership place rather than a frustrated parent place!

Think about your best bosses, those leaders that created a safe, inspiring workplace where you were immensely productive and thoroughly engaged. It is extremely likely that your best boss’ moods were positive and consistent; those moods didn’t fluctuate wildly.

Our best bosses validated our efforts and accomplishments promptly – and they redirected our efforts when we missed the mark. They expressed their disappointment firmly and kindly, asking us to shift our actions. They did not discount our value as people while doing so.

All of us experience disappointment and frustrations. When we take our frustrations out on our colleagues, family, or friends, we create dissonance and distrust, not respect and dignity.

I coach leaders to “put on a happy face,” to act positive and optimistic even when things are not going as planned. It requires effort to wear that happy face. It may require that leaders insulate their teams from the confusion going on outside their team.

Leaders need to be honest with how things are going – don’t say things are fine when they’re not. Do, however, present the realities from an optimistic viewpoint, not a depressive one.

Even if a bad mood arises, the most effective leaders set that mood aside, and present a kind, pleasant, and non-judging approach in every interaction.

What do you think? How did your best bosses manage their moods to reduce negative impact on team members? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

Photo © pathdoc – Dollar Photo Club. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on my podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I play all instruments on these recordings.


Subscribe to Chris’ mobile updates, texted right to your smartphone! Text VALUES to 72000 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


vimeo_logoChris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips are also available on Vimeo. Subscribe to Chris’ Vimeo channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2016 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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