Tag Archives | Character

Culture Leadership Charge – A Crisis of Respect

We face a crisis of respect and civility in the US today.

This crisis is not unique to Americans but a recent study describes the huge concerns many Americans have with civility and respect in our country right now.

The biggest recent story is the exposure of some Hollywood producers and directors for years of sexual harassment and sexual assault of female actors. The #MeToo hashtag has exploded with women across all industries and countries sharing their experiences of sexual harassment and assault by men in power.

Incivility and disrespect play out every day in our homes, neighborhoods, workplaces, politics, and social media networks around the globe.

The 2017 survey of Civility in America, an annual study undertaken by Weber Shandwick, Powell Tate, and KRC Research, found that the belief that the US has a major civility problem is at a record high – nearly 70% of respondents agreed with that statement. 75% of Americans believe that incivility has risen to crisis levels. 73% feel that the US is losing stature as a civil nation.

Only 22% of respondents believe civility in America will get better in the coming years.

Disrespect and incivility erode trust, performance, service, and proactive problem solving – in our neighborhoods and workplaces.

There is a solution to this crisis of respect and civility.

In today’s three-minute episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I describe this simple, actionable solution in detail.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) videos that describe proven culture leadership and servant leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube channel. If you like what you see, please subscribe!

Check out @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership Charge video series on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube Click To Tweet

Photo © Adobe Stock – vgstudio. All rights reserved.

To what degree is your home, community, and workplace a sanctuary of civility and respect? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

0

Culture Leadership Charge – Don’t Bump the Fishbowl

Have you ever “bumped the fishbowl?” Those fish aren’t happy when you do.

My best boss, Jerry Nutter, used this folksy reference to describe how leaders’ behavior is often much more damaging to their team members’ confidence, engagement, cooperation, and performance than leaders believe.

How do leaders “bump the fishbowl” and cause team members’ nerves to be on edge? They make structural or staffing changes with no context and no chance for questions. They take credit for team members’ work. They micromanage. They provide critical feedback 99% of the time, validating and praising only 1% of the time.

In today’s three-minute episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I describe how you can ensure you never “bump the fishbowl” with your team members.

Watch the video below to learn my three steps to serving, validating, and celebrating employees’ ideas and contributions every day.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) videos that describe proven culture leadership and servant leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube and Vimeo channels. If you like what you see, please subscribe!

View @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership Charge video series on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube & @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © Adobe Stock – Mirek Kijewski. All rights reserved.



Does your boss “bump the fishbowl” today? What is the impact of that boss’ behavior? How do your best bosses facilitate your success? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

0

Culture Leadership Charge – A Question of Character

Your character is showing!

Every interaction we have with others demonstrates our character, for better or worse. If we treat people kindly and act in service, our character is showing. If we demean, discount, or dismiss others, our character is showing!

In today’s episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I make the case for strong service character. What our workplaces, families, and communities need – right now – is high moral and ethical quality of interactions from each of us.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) videos that describe proven culture leadership and service leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my my YouTube channel and my my Vimeo channel. If you like what you see, please subscribe!

View @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership Charge video series on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube & @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © Lisa F. Young – Adobe Stock. All rights reserved.



How kind and “of service” are your organization’s leaders? When people feel authentically cared for, what is the positive impact that you see or experience? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

0

Culture Leadership Charge – The “Managing by Announcements” Fallacy

How well are new policies and procedures embraced in your organization? If you’re like most companies, it all depends on how well – and how quickly – those new expectations are embedded as practices.

It doesn’t matter what the change is – it could be a new software system or a new purpose statement. What matters is what happens after the change is announced. Yet most leaders operate under the faulty assumption that telling people what is expected ensures alignment to the change.

This fallacy is known as “managing by announcements,” where leaders announce the details of a change, then expect that all players will immediately embrace the new expectations.

In today’s episode of my Culture Leadership Charge video series, I share how leaders can increase the success of new processes or procedures by embedding them, reinforcing them, and celebrating them – not just announcing them.

My Culture Leadership Charge series features short (two-to-three-minute) segments that describe proven culture leadership practices that boost engagement, service, and results across your work teams, departments, regions, and even your entire company.

Each episode’s “charge” is a challenge for everyone in your organization – not just leaders – to refine their behaviors and ensure everyone is treated respectfully at all times.

You’ll find my Culture Leadership Charge episodes and more on my YouTube and Vimeo channels. If you like what you see, please subscribe.

Don't miss @scedmonds #Culture #Leadership #Charge videos on @YouTube http://drtc.me/ytube & @Vimeo http://drtc.me/vimeo Click To Tweet

Photo © tempakul – Adobe Stock. All rights reserved.



What is your experience with leaders “managing by announcements”? How have your best bosses helped embed the new approaches effectively? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

4

September 2015 Leadership Development Carnival

leadership_carnival logoI’m delighted to host this month’s Leadership Development Carnival.

This carnival features thought leaders in leadership, engagement, service, and culture every month. I know you will enjoy these great posts – please share them if you find them valuable.

Wally Bock says it’s not the difference between quitting and not quitting. Winners quit smart. Learn more in his post, Winners Never Quit?

Neal Burgess believes that leaders know how to bring out the best in their employees – especially those who are creative and innovative. These employees know how to generate, create and produce ideas and turn them into breakthrough results. Learn how in Bringing Out the Innovator in Your Employees.

Moving from peer to boss is one of the most common and challenging transitions in a leader’s career. In Randy Conley‘s post, Moving from Peer to Boss – 5 Steps to Success, he outlines five ways that anyone can employ to move or coach someone through this career milestone.

David Dye might raise some eyebrows with his post, The Leadership Heresy You Can’t Live Without.

If you’ve ever been passed over for a promotion, Joel Garfinkle says now is the time to act. His post, How to Ask For and Get a Promotion, offers a list of actions you can take immediately to improve your visibility.

David Greer‘s post, Trust from the Inside Out, shares his insights after a series of eye surgeries. His focus is that us humans judge quickly, often based on what we see – not on what is within the other person’s heart.

Understanding the world around us is essential to effective leadership. Nobody is more important to your leadership success than understanding your boss. Bruce Harpham‘s post outlines the 4 part observation strategy to understand your boss.

Mike Henry, Sr. suggests leaders can improve their effectiveness with an Attitude Adjustment – Focus on Others.

John Hunter asks, “Why do you hire dead wood? Or why do you hire live wood and kill it?” in his post on the Deming Institute.

Effective leaders make use of compelling stories. Karin Hurt shares her “STORIES” method for crafting exciting stories that will energize your leadership and team.

When introverted and extroverted leaders take a step back and approach conflict in a healthy way, they can achieve extraordinary results. Jennifer Kahnweiler‘s Smartblogs post, Introverted and Extroverted Leaders: Bring on the Battles helps both focus on the results they are each trying to achieve.

Jill Mallack offers advice for leaders to keep in touch with what’s going on. Don’t be blindsided: Be a Leader Who is in the Know.

Susan Mazza‘s post, How Leaders Drive Behavior, examines how people naturally start to notice what you choose to frequently shine the spotlight on. That’s how they learn what they should focus on, which amplifies whatever message you send.

Dan McCarthy‘s article, 3 Little Words, explains why “I trust you” is a vitally important message in our workplaces.

Robyn McLeod presents WAIT! Why am I talking? where she shares the acronym WAIT, which strengthens your communication skills, listening skills, and leadership skills.

Eileen McDargh wonders “Is Amazon’s Bezos Busted?” Eileen posits that Bezos is pretty disconnected from the daily reality of Amazon’s corporate headquarters.

As part of the Jim Blanchard Leadership Forum, Jon Mertz got Daniel Pink’s take on generations, career, and leadership. Pink even shares the one thing he believes Millennials should remember when developing their own leadership skills and mindsets.

Jennifer V. Miller tapped practitioners and experts in career management and leadership development to determine the best practices in filling a company’s leadership pipeline. Read their recommendations in Tips for Running a High-Potential Leadership Development Program.

Want to learn How Feedback Can Help Your Employees Succeed and Grow? Read Tanveer Naseer‘s post.

Do you include stories that influence people in your leadership tool kit? Or do you resort to data-speak because that’s what you learned to do? In her article, Learn to Tell Stories that Influence, Dr. Anne Perschel presents six elements will help you build effective stories.

Steve Roesler offers three practical actions for leaders who might be wondering what they can do to coach their people in his post, Do Your Leaders Coach?

John Spence‘s video blog, Vision, Mission, and Values: More Than Words On Paper, outlines why John thinks your organization needs to formalize these elements.

In 3 Lessons from the Attack on Amazon, Michael Lee Stallard shares three important lessons for leaders.

Jesse Lyn Stoner believes people don’t resist change. Change is a normal and natural part of living. The only time you stop changing is when you’re dead. What people resist is having change imposed on them. In her post, 3 Guidelines to Avoid Resistance to Change, she outlines ways to invite people to participate in the change process that will minimize resistance to change.

In his article, Collective Leadership: From the Bottom Up, Jim Taggart looks at leadership through the lens of a volatile, unpredictable global economy, driven heavily by technological change. What has happened to leadership in the process? Has it evolved to become more “collective” in our interconnected, complex world? Read Jim’s post to learn more.

Linda Fisher Thornton ponders What’s the Difference Between Ethical and Unethical Selling? See if you can relate to these descriptions of ethical and unethical selling, and take a moment to consider the important leadership questions that follow.

Bill Treasurer‘s post, Leadership is Freak’n Hard, explains how good leaders nearly always start out as bad leaders. They become more effective by first becoming less ineffective. Doing that requires a careful understanding of what makes leadership so freak’n hard.

Thomas J. Walter presents Creative Destruction: Philosophy in Leadership, where he shares how his leadership team moved from maintenance and management to intellectual stimulating actions to boost effectiveness.

One of the best ways to nip a turnover issue in the bud and to potentially gain a competitive advantage over competitors is to fix your leadership issues, with the greatest bang for your buck being at the frontline level. This post from Mary Ila Ward suggests 2 Steps to Keep People from Quitting.

And from my Driving Results Through Culture blog, a rather sobering post about employee engagement – Work: Where the Human Spirit Goes to Die.


Subscribe to Chris’ twice a month updates! Text VALUES to 66866 or head here.


Chris’ new “Culture Leadership Charge” series and the rest of his video clips can be found on YouTube. Subscribe to Chris’ YouTube channel.


podcast_subscribeSubscribe to Chris’ posts via RSS.


itunes_subscribeListen to or subscribe to over 300 of Chris’ Culture Leadership Podcasts on iTunes.


The music heard on Chris’ podcasts is from one of his songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © 2005-2017 Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). He played all instruments, recorded all tracks, and mastered the final product for your listening pleasure.

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, Chris will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, Chris only recommend products or services he uses personally and believes will add value to his readers. Chris is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes