Don’t settle for less than talented, engaged players

Car keys.Awhile back, Tom was out walking his dog near his home. He bumped into a neighbor who was out walking her dog, so they joined forces for awhile.

The dogs enjoyed each other’s company and the two neighbors made small talk. Until Tom’s neighbor asked about bringing her car in for service at the dealership where Tom worked.

Tom thought, “Boy, I hope she doesn’t get Keith as her service advisor. He’s really not very friendly with customers – even though we’ve coached him about it. Brenda isn’t much better. Maybe I can direct her to Mark so she has a great experience!”

Tom didn’t want his relationship with his neighbor hurt by one of their “prickly” service advisors. He said to his neighbor,”That’s awesome. I’ll hook you up with Mark – he’s a great service advisor.”

The good news is that Tom knew who his dealership’s worst and best service advisors were and he could direct his neighbor to a good advisor. But what about the dozens of customers who came in that week who had to work with their “less than great” advisors? Those lousy customer impressions wouldn’t help their business, at all.

Wouldn’t it be better if Tom didn’t have to think through his company’s good & not-so-good team members? What if all of their team members were talented and engaged – and loved serving customers? How would that impact their business?

My research and experience proves that employees who experience trust and respect from their bosses, colleagues, and company are more productive – 30-40% more productive – than those who do not experience trust and respect from their bosses, colleagues, and company.

Employees that are trusted and respected in their workplace also serve customers better and demonstrate greater commitment to their jobs. They are more likely to apply discretionary energy to solve problems, cooperate with peers, and implement tweaks to boost efficiency and results.

Leaders must be attuned to more than just performance. They must also be attuned to how customers are treated – and to how employees are treated, by leaders and peers.

When effective leaders learn about performance issues, they act. They engage with the player to clarify performance expectations. They learn how the player has been working in the system and redirect efforts to meet performance standards. They observe closely to ensure traction on desired results – and praise when the player exceeds performance standards.

When effective leaders learn about interaction issues – when they hear about rude, abrupt, or dismissive treatment of customers or employees by anyone – they act. They engage with the player to clarify values standards and interaction expectations. They learn how the player has been operating with customers and peers and redirect efforts to meet values standards. They observe closely to ensure traction on desired values in every interaction – and praise when the player exceeds values standards.

What do effective leaders do when coaching doesn’t solve performance problems? They find a place in the business where the player can genuinely contribute or they help that player find another job elsewhere.

What do effective leaders do when coaching doesn’t solve values issues? They don’t waste any time. They help that player find another job elsewhere.

How clear are values expectations in your team or company? What happens when your company tolerates poor treatment of employees or customers? Share your insights on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google +.

How healthy is your team or company’s culture? Don’t guess – get the data with my online Culture Effectiveness Assessment.

Want hands-on guidance for boosting productivity while reducing drama at work? Join me in Denver for my Culture Leadership Roundtable. This series, based on my book, The Culture Engine, meets one-morning-a-month starting in March.

Photo © Kurhan – Dollar Photo Club. All rights reserved.

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