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Business TeamDoes bullying happen in your work environment? New research by the Workplace Bullying Institute reveals that it is likely.

72% of Americans are aware that workplace bullying happens. Of those, 27% have experienced workplace bullying personally and 21% have witnessed abusive treatment of players in their work environment.

Workplace bullying is a global phenomena. Ellen Cobb’s excellent 2012 research outlines global incidence, impact, and attempts to address workplace bullying in countries around the world.

This infographic outlines the “lowlights” of the 2014 US Workplace Bullying Survey.

A new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry underscores the long-term costs of childhood bullying. The harmful effects can extend for decades after the initial bullying! The study found that effects include lower levels of education, greater physical and mental health problems, and poor social functioning throughout victims’ lives.

Bullying – in or out of the workplace – erodes trust, erodes confidence, reduces performance, and creates health problems.

How do employers respond to workplace bullying? The WBI survey found that 25% of US employers believe workplace bullying doesn’t happen in their companies. They do not investigate complaints.

16% of US employers discount the impact of workplace bullying; they know about it but believe it’s not a big deal. 15% rationalize it – these US employers believe that workplace bullying is a routine way of doing business (!).

11% of US employers defend workplace bullying, particularly when the perpetrators are executives and managers. 5% of US employers encourage it, believing it is necessary to be competitive today.

Only 12% of US employers act to eliminate workplace bullying. Another 6% condemn it through zero-tolerance policies and procedures.

What can you do? First, learn what resources are available to you. The Workplace Bullying Institute provides tools and services for individuals and employers.

Second, build a foundation of trust and respect in your work team. You don’t have to fix your whole division or company – just aim at improving your work team’s environment.

Most teams and companies focus exclusively on getting production done – not on the quality of the work environment. You can change that dynamic by crafting “great citizenship” guidelines for all team members.

Outline the values, behaviors, and norms that will enable work team dignity and respect. Make your values measurable (this post can help you). Invite team members to help refine those behaviors. Then publish them. Ask every team member to model them, praise them when others model them, and coach others when they see misaligned behavior.

These steps can create workplace inspiration – and eliminate bullying within your team, one step at a time.

What do you think? Does your employer act to eliminate bullying or even condemn it, or not so much? How does your work team address abusive conduct today? Share your thoughts about this post/podcast in the comments section below.

Subscribe to my free weekly blog & podcast updates and enjoy two fabulous gifts: my Be a GREAT Boss ebook plus an excerpt from my new #GREAT Bosses tweet book.

Get your free copy of my ChangeThis manifesto, “What? Your Organization Doesn’t Have a Constitution?

Add your experiences to two fast & free research projects I have underway: the Great Boss Assessment and the Performance-Values Assessment. Results and analysis are available on my research page.

Photo © istockphoto.com/yanc. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I plays all instruments on these recordings.


Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Clear the Path

April 14, 2014 — Leave a comment

iStock_000001765937SmallHow easy is it for your team members to deliver consistent performance? How easy is it for them to act as great corporate citizens?

It’s possible that your work environment has hurdles and hindrances that inhibit team members from doing the right things the right way the first time.

I would go so far to say that it’s probable that your work environment suffers from some of these hurdles!

Clients report a number of things that get in the way of consistent performance by teams and members. The most common hurdles include:

  • Skill gaps – team members do not have the knowledge or skills required to deliver the products or services that have been promised
  • Resources – the right raw materials aren’t available when needed, or unrealistic deadlines frustrate team members, or there are too few team members to carry the load
  • Systems – policies and procedures are inefficient (at best) or downright broken (at worst)

Clients also report common hurdles to great corporate citizenship. They include:

  • Teamwork – team members don’t get along, don’t trust each other, and don’t cooperate
  • Incentives – individual compensation plans cause team members to ensure that they win while their peers lose
  • Tolerations – rude behavior between team members (and bosses and even customers) is not addressed; it continues because it is tolerated

There are dozens of things leaders and teams can try to address these hurdles and hindrances. What many clients have found beneficial is a change in perspective: don’t try to address all the hurdles – simply create a formal pathway to high performance and values alignment.

Make it Easy to Stay on Track

Imagine a wheat field, ready for harvest. The plants are thick, strong, and tall. Walking through that field would be difficult! The footing would be uneven. You’d have to push plants out of the way to make any progress. You’d struggle to walk on a straight line; you’d be focused on each step, not on the direction you’re heading.

Now imagine a smooth, paved path through the heavy wheat field. You’d easily traverse the acres. The direction you need to go is obvious. You’d not waste time or energy on the journey.

You’d rather stay on the paved portion than veer off into the plants. The paved portion makes your journey easy.

This is exactly what #GreatBosses do, every day. They smooth the path for teams and members towards consistent high performance and consistent great citizenship.

They smooth the way by:

  • Clarifying, communicating, and reinforcing their team’s purpose, values and behaviors, strategies, and goals, every day.
  • Engaging with team members frequently to gauge performance progress. They listen and learn about performance hurdles and hindrances, and address them promptly if the team isn’t already doing so itself.
  • Modeling the team’s purpose, values, and behaviors in every interaction.
  • Celebrating team member’s demonstration of the team’s purpose, values, and behaviors – and coaching or redirecting misaligned behaviors.

What do you think? How clear is your team’s path towards top performance and great citizenship? What hurdles and hinderances do you see your team or team members facing today? Share your thoughts about this post/podcast in the comments section below.

Subscribe to my free weekly blog & podcast updates and enjoy two “fabulous gifts:” my Be a GREAT Boss ebook plus an excerpt from my new #GREAT Bosses tweet book.

Get your free copy of my ChangeThis manifesto, “What? Your Organization Doesn’t Have a Constitution?

Add your experiences to two fast & free research projects I have underway: the Great Boss Assessment and the Performance-Values Assessment. Results and analysis are available on my research page.

Photo © istockphoto.com/pelvidge. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I plays all instruments on these recordings.


Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Contented Workers

April 7, 2014 — Leave a comment

Wellbeign at WorkHow happy are your company’s employees? The Gallup organization recently revealed the results of their research on the US communities with the most contented workers.

The Gallup-Healthways Well Being Index measures respondents’ perceptions in six areas:

  • Life Evaluation: Present life situation and anticipated life situation
  • Emotional Health: Daily feelings and mental state
  • Work Environment: Job satisfaction and workplace interactions
  • Physical Health: Physical ability to live a full life
  • Healthy Behavior: Engaging in behaviors that affect physical health
  • Basic Access: Feeling safe, satisfied, and optimistic within a community

Gallup and Healthways survey 500 Americans each day. They’ve conducted the Well Being Index since January 2008. The Well-Being Index is being updated in 2014 to assess respondents’ perceptions in five areas that analysis showed would be better measures of well-being. We’ll see these new focus areas in results issued next year.

The community with the most contented workers was Provo-Orem, Utah, with an overall well-being score of 71.4 on a 100-point scale. Rounding out the top three communities are Boulder, CO (with a score of 71.3) and Ft. Collins-Loveland, CO (71.1).

The three communities with the least contented workers are Huntington-Ashland, KY/WV/OH (this metropolitan area spans portions of three states) with a score of 59.5, Charleston, WV (60.0), and Redding, CA (62.0).

Numerous studies of well being and employee engagement prove that employees with high engagement and well being produce more, innovate more, and serve customers better.

What can leaders do to boost employee well being in these six areas?

Company leaders can influence communities to enact policies that inspire residents to engage in healthy activities. Getting communities to enact policies might take awhile.

Company and team leaders can certainly work to ensure job satisfaction and healthy workplace interactions. Check out my free ChangeThis manifesto to learn how.

Team leaders don’t need a formal mandate. They can enact informal approaches that inspire team members to embrace healthy activities. Arranging lunchtime or mid-afternoon walks with interested team members can inspire physical activity. Enrolling a team in a charity walk can inspire bonding, service, and physical health.

Bringing in a yoga teacher and providing space for interested team members to do a class before or after work is increasing in popularity.

Learning new and interesting things can be as simple as bringing in outside experts for lunchtime presentations. A nutrition expert can demonstrate simple, healthy meal preparation or inform about the season’s freshest produce.

Team leaders are only limited by their own assumed constraints. If they think healthy living is something team members must do on their own, they won’t try some of these approaches. If they believe that everyone (including themselves) can benefit from exposure to healthier practices, they’ll be creative with some of these approaches.

You want to create a variety of healthy approaches for team members. Don’t mandate these activities – simply make them available, easy, and interesting.

By arranging participation in these and similar activities, your own well being – and that of team members – will grow, right before your eyes.

What do you think? How contented are you? How contented are your work peers, today? How can leaders inspire healthier opportunities daily to boost well being and engagement? Share your thoughts about this post/podcast in the comments section below.

Subscribe to my free weekly blog & podcast updates and enjoy two “fabulous gifts:” my Be a GREAT Boss ebook plus an excerpt from my new #GREAT Bosses tweet book.

Get your free copy of my ChangeThis manifesto, “What? Your Organization Doesn’t Have a Constitution?

Add your experiences to two fast & free research projects I have underway. The Great Boss Assessment compares your current boss’ behaviors with those of great bosses. The Performance-Values Assessment compares your organization’s culture practices to those of high performing, values-aligned teams and organizations. Results and analysis are available on my research page.

Photo © istockphoto.com/olm26250. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I plays all instruments on these recordings.


Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

No Absolutes

March 31, 2014 — Leave a comment

IMG_1289Many of us think in terms of absolutes – despite the reality around us that demonstrates how this life is filled with nuances and subtleties.

I grew up in Southern California near the beaches of Orange County. I was a surfer who used to catch waves for a couple of hours before heading to class in high school.

I had no experience with real weather until moving to Colorado nearly ten years ago.

We experience “adventuresome mountain living” at 8400 feet above sea level. Snow, sleet, ice, etc. are a part of daily life for at least six months out of the year. To thrive here, you’d better embrace the reality.

The calendar shows we’re almost to April, yet we’ve still got snow on the ground in shady areas. Our pond is still frozen despite the 40-degree temperatures. On the north side of our house, the walkway is covered in ice – which totally confuses my “absolutes” brain.

How can ice exist when the outside temperature is well above freezing? Shouldn’t the ice and snow melt away once the temps hit 33 degrees?

The environment “is what it is!” The ground isn’t above 32 degrees. Overnight temperatures are still in the teens. Until the earth below the surface heats up, we’ll still have ice and snow.

Leaders think in absolutes all the time – despite the reality around them that demonstrates how their work environment is filled with nuances and subtleties.

Maybe the leader announces a new policy or new practices, yet teams continue to behave as if nothing has changed. The leader thinks, “What’s the matter with them? I told them what the new policies are!”

Maybe the leader asks teams to be self-directed, managing their day-to-day efforts independently to meet project deadlines. But if the team has never experienced self-directed teaming, they don’t know what to do. So, they sit, waiting to be told. The leader thinks, “What’s the matter with them? Why don’t they just get to it?”

Maybe the leader gives the “salesperson of the year” award to a player who exceeds their quota by 100% but who uses shady practices to reach those sales numbers. He or she might poach business from fellow sales team members. He or she might over-promise to get the sale, and frustrate the customer weeks later when the company can’t deliver on those grand promises.

Peers complain about who won the award. The leader thinks, “What’s the matter with them? He sold more than anyone else – he deserves the award!”

There are rarely pure absolutes in our work environments. Leaders can’t just pay attention to the output – that’s hanging out on the edges of what’s really happening. #GreatBosses engage in the midst of the processes and work efforts so they understand the nuances and subtleties. Those leaders can then reinforce desirable nuances and quash undesirable nuances, day in and day out.

Over time, the right nuances lead to the right behaviors. Those right behaviors lead to promises delivered and WOW’ed customers . . . which is absolutely a desirable work environment.

What do you think? What absolute beliefs get in the way of your effective day-to-day contributions? How well do your leaders engage in the midst of processes and efforts to create #WorkplaceInspirationShare your thoughts about this post/podcast in the comments section below.

Subscribe to my free weekly blog & podcast updates and enjoy two “fabulous gifts:” my Be a GREAT Boss ebook plus an excerpt from my new #GREAT Bosses tweet book.

Get your free copy of my ChangeThis manifesto, “What? Your Organization Doesn’t Have a Constitution?

Add your experiences to two fast & free research projects I have underway. The Great Boss Assessment compares your current boss’ behaviors with those of great bosses. The Performance-Values Assessment compares your organization’s culture practices to those of high performing, values-aligned teams and organizations. Results and analysis are available on my research page.

Photo © Chris Edmonds on iStock. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I plays all instruments on these recordings.


Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Your Right Path

March 24, 2014 — Leave a comment

Footstep on the sandWhom do you trust and respect? What about those people’s plans, decisions, and actions cause you to look up to them?

I’ve always been fascinated by the human condition and how us imperfect beings react to our circumstances.

We all face both desirable and undesirable scenarios each day. We experience bad breaks we don’t deserve and bad breaks we do deserve. We experience good breaks we deserve and good breaks we don’t deserve.

I’m inspired by people who remain calm, confident, and kind in the face of their circumstances, who ride out their good and bad breaks steadily, always moving forward on their chosen path.

How do these calm, aligned, kind players find their path? My studies have helped me gain some insights into proven avenues to that alignment. Many world religions outline very similar avenues. In Buddhist traditions, for example, it’s called the Eightfold Path (you can learn more here and here.

This path is intended as a guide to help us humans see life realistically. Exploring these areas can help us settle in to our right or proper path.

Ponder these eight areas:

  • Right (or Proper) View – Understanding that our personal views of the world may inhibit our ability to see the world clearly. Us humans have many beliefs that can cloud our ability to live in the present without mental noise and anguish. This area invites exploration to assess any beliefs that contribute to clouding our views.
  • Right Intention – If one’s intentions on this day are to treat others kindly and fairly, one typically does exactly that. If our intentions are driven by our anger, resentment, or greed, then we are more likely to treat others badly. Having wholesome intentions takes practice!
  • Right Action – Clear intention helps one demonstrate aligned actions. The right actions help us behave in ways that helps and doesn’t harm ourselves or others. We need to pay attention to the impact of our plans, decisions, and actions on others, not just ourselves.
  • Right Speech – In any communications one makes – speaking, writing, emailing, etc. – choose to not hurt feelings, lie, gossip, or intentionally make people angry or defensive. This doesn’t mean that you cannot share your ideas or opinions! It means that one ensures his or her communications are honest and helpful.
  • Right Livelihood – This area doesn’t mean that there are good or bad places to work. It means that we must be aware of how we behave in our workplace – how we treat peers, bosses, and customers. We can choose how to behave and how our workplace ethics are demonstrated.
  • Right Effort – Effort towards undesirable ends doesn’t help us. Aligned effort enables us to demonstrate compassion and contribution. It can help us step away from greed, anger, and fear.
  • Right Mindfulness – Pay attention to what you pay attention to! The little voices in our heads can distract us from being present. Mindfulness keeps one anchored in the moment, engaging with others kindly, and applying our skills in service to others.
  • Right Concentration – Multitasking doesn’t work. Concentration asks us to focus on one thing at a time. It lets us sharpen our thinking, refine thinking that causes us anxiety and stress, and contribute more consistently and kindly.

Further exploration of these areas will benefit me. I have much to learn before I act calmly, confidently, and kindly in every circumstance!

What do you think? What causes you to trust and respect certain people you interact with or observe? To what degree have you engaged in any of these areas to be more calm, confident, and kind? Share your thoughts about this post/podcast in the comments section below.

Subscribe to my free weekly blog & podcast updates and enjoy two “fabulous gifts:” my Be a GREAT Boss ebook plus an excerpt from my new #GREAT Bosses tweet book.

Get your free copy of my ChangeThis manifesto, “What? Your Organization Doesn’t Have a Constitution?

Add your experiences to two fast & free research projects I have underway. The Great Boss Assessment compares your current boss’ behaviors with those of great bosses. The Performance-Values Assessment compares your organization’s culture practices to those of high performing, values-aligned teams and organizations. Results and analysis are available on my research page.

Photo © istockphoto.com/Malbert. All rights reserved.

Subscribe!Podcast – Listen to this post now with the player below. Subscribe via RSS or iTunes.

The music heard on these podcasts is from one of my songs, “Heartfelt,” copyright © Chris Edmonds Music (ASCAP). I plays all instruments on these recordings.


Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”